philanthropy

Hey Boomers: What's next after you exit your business?

You've had a long and successful career. Maybe you've climbed the ranks to the C-suite or you've built a company from the ground up. You've accomplished so much, but you suspect it's time for the next chapter. Sure golf and travel sounds great, but you aren't quite ready to be put out to pasture. So what's next? 

We work with clients to find an answer to that exact question. We believe that philanthropy can be that next rewarding adventure. 

You have earned so much valuable experience and knowledge from your career... something that most nonprofit and charitable organizations would greatly benefit from. 

The nonprofit industry faces a troubling dilemma. Due to the inability to pay competitive salaries, they cannot attract the much-needed, top talent in from business world. (See Dan Pallotta's TED Talk for more on the misguided ideals that limit nonprofits from making any large-scale global change.) But a non-profit needs the same business skills that a for-profit company needs.

This is where retired executives can play an important role. Serving as advisors, Board Members, volunteers and strategic donors, individuals (retired or not) with valuable business acumen can take a non-profit to the next level. 

But, as Bill Black, certified exit planner, financial expert and host of Exit Coach Radio asked SGS CEO Kate Azar in an interview (full interview below), how does one find a social cause that is really meaningful to them? This is where we come in.

At SGS, we look at a client's past philanthropic activity. Where has our client donated to, volunteered or which Boards do they sit on? Which of these activities have been because a friend or colleagues asked for their contribution and which are because the cause was really meaningful to the individual? 

We also ask about our client's values. What legacy does our client want to leave behind? What values do they want to pass on to their children and grandchildren?

And finally, what keeps our clients up at night? Do they read or watch the news and see an issue that really makes them mad.. or gets them excited? 

These questions help us to get to the core of our client's motivations in philanthropy and help us to match them to a social cause that is meaningful, exciting and in line with our client's values. 

SGS CEO Featured on ESPN Radio's Real Talk San Diego

Social Good Strategies CEO Kate Azar was featured on ESPN Radio's Real Talk San Diego to discuss her work advising successful and corporate clients on their philanthropy. If you missed the live broadcast, you can listen to it here. 

"Real Talk" features community business leaders and entrepreneurs sharing their insights and opinions on business, finance, real estate, political and lifestyle related topics that impact our communities. 

What Is A Philanthropic Advisor

I often find myself explaining what a philanthropic advisor does. People are always interested in the job, much for the same reason I love my work.  After all, I get to help people change the world! While the philanthropic advising industry is not new, there aren't many people offering these types of services.  In the US, there are more than 260,000 financial advisors available to help people make sounds financial investments, but there are fewer than 1,000 professionals available to help the public make wise philanthropic donations.  That number is astonishing given that there are more than 1.5 million nonprofits in the US alone.  So, what does a philanthropic advisor do?

Many of us have financial planners, investment or wealth advisors to guide us in our financial investments. Similarly, a philanthropic advisor helps you define your values and dreams for the world and build a philanthropic strategy for accomplishing those goals.  At Social Good Strategies, we help you decide where your philanthropic investments should be made to create the intended impact. Together, we identify your values, draft a mission statement, and get clear on what success looks like to you. Then we help you identify philanthropic opportunities that align with your goals and values. We make sure you have the information you need to make sound philanthropic investment decisions and track your results. 

Certainly, a philanthropic advisor isn't for everyone but philanthropic strategy should be. Whether you are giving away $1 thousand or $1 million, you should be thoughtful about the impact your money makes. A philanthropic advisor can help you be more effective in your giving. Read more about the services we offer here

 

Strategic vs. Checkbook Philanthropy

What is Strategic Philanthropy?

Many people ask me what I mean when I talk about "strategic philanthropy."  There are many varying definitions for the term, including a common association with corporate philanthropy. But when it comes to personal or family philanthropy, being strategic with your philanthropic planning means to do so with design and planning backed by research, specific and measurable goals, indicators of success, all to have a measurable impact. 

I often contrast the concept with what we call "checkbook philanthropy," wherein one gives to causes ad hoc with little further communication or follow up on the part of donor or the nonprofit recipient.  Most of us give small amounts (or maybe large amounts) here and there when a friend or charity makes an appeal. An example of this would be to buy a chocolate bar from a kid outside the grocery store to support his baseball team, sending $20 in response to a charity mailing, or donating to a friend's charity walk. There is nothing wrong with this type of giving, every little bit helps (see President Obama's fundraising campaign!) but this type of giving probably won't be as transformative as one or two larger planned gifts.  Also, this type of giving can often leave a donor feeling unsatisfied as we are left with little feedback as to how our contribution really impacted the cause.  

Another fun phrase in the philanthropist's lexicon is "drive-by philanthropy," a term I borrowed from Attorney John Fraker and his podcast Family Philanthropy Radio.  He describes "drive by philanthropy" as a situation in which a family foundation or donor gives to so many causes that they are really not able to be truly engaged with any cause. 

Charity is just writing checks and not being engaged. Philanthropy, to me, is being engaged, not only with your resources but getting people and yourself really involved and doing things that haven’t been done before.
— Eli Broad

Often, I advise my clients to pick 2-3 causes to engage, as opposed to many, allowing them to make a more significant impact in these issue areas by really delving into the issue and getting to know the cause, and its stakeholders well.  I help my clients find a handful of causes that are important to them.  Together, we explore theories of change and action.  We come up with a personal mission and find partners, nonprofits and charities that align.  We really listen to the players and other important stakeholders and explore how we can best make an impact.  We ask nonprofits and charities what they really need and how our client's time, talent and treasure can be most helpful. We track the results of our client's giving, and tell the story of how their contributions made a difference.  Then we plan for the next year based on what we've learned -- what worked, and what didn't.  This is one of the benefits of strategic philanthropy and, in my opinion, the most effective philanthropy. 

Another benefit of having an annual philanthropic plan, when you get those "drive-by" requests (the ones that you give to out of guilt, rather than genuine interest), you can politely decline, explaining that you already have all your charitable funds committed for this year but you'd be happy to consider the request next year.  Then we can explore whether the cause fits in your personal charitable mission. 

Learn more about how we build a sound philanthropic strategy here

The Launch of LA's Future

Social Good Strategies is proud to announce the launch of our client, Donna Bojarsky's ambitious and exciting new venture Future of Cities.  Social Good Strategies's CEO, Kate Azar, served as Chief of Staff and Advisor to the project.  

Future of Cities will spur a course-changing conversation about how to reinvigorate civic stewardship in Los Angeles.  As explained on the initiative's website:

SGS CEO, Kate Azar; Bob Johnson COO and Co-Founder, Future of Cities, Deborah Brutchey, Executive Director,  LA Works , and June Baldwin, Senior Vice President, General Counsel, Corporate & Legal Affairs,  KCET  at Future of Cities event in Beverly Hills, Calif., June 2, 2015, Photo by Jonathan Alcorn   — with  Kate Azar  in  Los Angeles, California .

SGS CEO, Kate Azar; Bob Johnson COO and Co-Founder, Future of Cities, Deborah Brutchey, Executive Director, LA Works, and June Baldwin, Senior Vice President, General Counsel, Corporate & Legal Affairs, KCET at Future of Cities event in Beverly Hills, Calif., June 2, 2015, Photo by Jonathan Alcorn — with Kate Azar in Los Angeles, California.

“Cities are recognized as the most important laboratory for a successfully organized society, and ground zero for creative ambition. Los Angeles is an important hub with powerful symbolic value. Yet, it is often overlooked for the role it plays in the world both financially and culturally. We are hindered by a traditionally weak civic fabric. LA is a segmented city lacking a dynamic, engaged and representative leadership cadre. Furthermore, we have precious limited infrastructure to bring forth a new generation dedicated to a sustainable world-class city.

This is the perfect time to promote a new kind of civic stewardship representative of today’s Los Angeles – a region of unparalleled diversity, technology, entertainment, media, venture capital, environmental consciousness, and creative capital.

Future of Cities: Leading in LA is a civic initiative that aims to reinvigorate the involvement of civic leaders in creating a vibrant, cutting edge future for Los Angeles. Our goal is to marry vision, leadership and results to fulfill LA’s ambitions and uplift this city.

 

On June 2nd, Future of Cities launched with a reception at the home of philanthropists Jeanne and Tony Pritzker with more than 100 civic leaders, philanthropists and activists, including Moby, LACMA's Michael Govan, The California Endowment's Robert K. Ross, President of Disney/ABC Television Group, Ben Sherwood, among others from across business, entertainment and philanthropy.  

Future of Cities will hold its first public event on October 19th at LACMA's Bing Theater. To attend, join the initiative and receive additional information, you can sign up here

Award winning musician and activist   Moby at the   Future of Cities event in Beverly Hills   on June 2nd. 

Award winning musician and activist Moby at the Future of Cities event in Beverly Hills on June 2nd. 

Press coverage of the event below. A full photo gallery from the event can be found on the Future of Cities Facebook page.

New future of LA initiative launches in a big way  Kevin Roderick - LA Observed
“More than 100 civic leaders, movers and activists gathered to lend support to a new effort to engage Los Angeles leadership in fresh ways….Bojarsky took a show of hands to see how many in the crowd were native Angelenos or had moved to LA (about half and half) then made a point by asking how many planned to leave. I didn't see any hands, which gave her an opening to press for their greater involvement in local affairs.”

Hollywood Tapped to Support 'Future of Cities' Initiative  Tina Daunt - Hollywood Reporter
“At a kickoff event this week, Donna Bojarsky brought a Beverly Hills living room crowded with movers-and-shakers from virtually every facet of Los Angeles life up to speed on her plans to bring that process back home in a grand new salon whose purpose is nothing less than the reimagination and revitalization of her city’s civic culture. Her new initiative — which is receiving final support from Disney, ABC, Sony Studios, ICM, and CAA — is called Future of Cities: Leading In L.A.”

Los Angeles Group Aims to Make the City ‘World Class’  Ted Johnson – Variety
“Los Angeles has a rather checkered history with the term “civic engagement.” Its disconnectedness seems to translate into low voter turnout for citywide elections or participation in cultural institutions. Hollywood, the industry, seems more apt to portray the city’s apocalypse than its moves toward livability.

Critic's Notebook: Visionaries search for key to civic engagement in L.A.  Christopher Hawthorne - LA Times
“Bojarsky is right, of course, that L.A.'s civic fabric has long been flimsy and prone to fray; for many decades, the city has been far better at promoting, and enabling, individual than collective ambition.”

Less Bike Lanes, More Jobs: 100 Civic Leaders Ponder L.A.’s Future  Marielle Wakim – LA Magazine
“Upon visiting L.A. in 1926, journalist H.L. Mencken noted “there were more morons collected in Los Angeles than in any other place on earth.” If he were still alive to be argued with, the movers and shakers at Tuesday’s Future of Cities launch event—including LACMA director Michael Govan, Moby, and our own editor in chief Mary Melton—would have taken Mencken to task. Founded by longtime city activist and Democratic Party consultant Donna Bojarsky, Future of Cities is an initiative that seeks to galvanize Los Angeles leaders into doing away with L.A.’s overt lack of civic cohesion and replacing it with an invested network of impassioned citizens.”

 

 

In Honor of Mothers

Mother’s Day: It’s a day to show your appreciation for the woman who raised you.. or to thank the mother of your children. (Seriously guys, if you’re not getting your wife a Mother’s Day gift, you should be. You’ll thank me for this marriage tip — “Happy wife, happy life,” etc.)  

Every year, I am reminded of all that my mother did for me.  She truly made me the woman I am today.  She taught me the value of hard work, independence and education. Being an entrepreneur can be challenging. My mother talks me through the hard days, boosts my confidence when I need it and gives me valuable advice.  She serves as my sounding board, a trusted advisor and my most supportive friend.  She continues to teach me patience and determination.  Most of all, she instilled in me a passion for philanthropy and charity.  Mothers have the hardest and most important job in the world—raising children.  That’s why, in addition to treating my beautiful mother and grandmother to brunch, I like to support family-focused causes in order to honor and support mothers around the world.  Some of my favorites: 

  • National Charity League fosters mother-daughter relationship building through philanthropy and community service. What a great thing to do after that Mother’s Day brunch!  
     
  • MomsRising.org focuses on mother and family related economic security issues such as paid family leave, earned sick days, affordable childcare and childhood nutrition.
     
  • Healthy Child Healthy World creates educational resources for parents and caregivers so they can make informed decisions to protect the health and development of their children. 
     
  • Human Options is an Orange County based charity that helps abused women, their children and families rebuild their lives. They work with the community to break the cycle of domestic violence. 
     
  • Kiva allows people to lend money to low-income and underserved entrepreneurs to start businesses and support their families. You can even buy your Mom a Kiva gift card so she can choose a woman to lend to. I love giving this gift to the person who has everything. 
     
  • Every Mother Counts supports maternal health programs making pregnancy and childbirth safe for mothers around the world. 

Americans will spend $21.2 billion on Mother’s Day gifts this year. While Mama certainly deserves to be showered with love and appreciation, imagine how less fortunate mothers around the world could be served with just a portion of these funds. 

So tell me, how do you honor your mom, grandmother or other motherly figures in your life on Mother’s Day?  What do you think about including philanthropy in your holiday?  I bet Mom would be proud! 

“What’s Possible” at the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit

Just as I wrap up my work at RALLY, my client Lyn Lear launches her climate film "What's Possible" at the United Nations Climate Summit. It was such a pleasure to work with the Lear's while I was at RALLY. They are so passionate about using their networks and influence to create a better world. I've had the pleasure of managing press outreach at a People for the American Way Foundation, founded by Norman Lear, Spirit of Liberty Awards event and then I had the great opportunity to help Lyn Davis Lear develop partnerships and a rollout for her latest film. Watch Lyn's inspirational film and learn how you can take part at www.takepart.com/climate

With people like the Lear's and the thousands of people who stand for climate action (see the People's Climate March), I am reminded of what's possible with the power of passionate people.